GLUTAMATE (MSG)BIBILIOGRAPHY<<BACK TO BIOLOGYINDEX

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Published on May 13, 2003


Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) causes Mental Disorders.

Glutamates are involved in epilepsy, schizophrenia and cognitive disorders (memory and learning).

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) is a natural salt of glutamic acid. MSG is used as a natural food additive to enhance flavors of industrialized food.

Currently, MSG is added to candies, chewing gum, seasonings, catsup, English sauce, soy sauce, all other sauces, gelatins, yeast extracts, calcium caseinate, soups, fruit drinks, thirst-quenchers, beer, corn gluten, almost all snacks, tofu, soy milk, industrial milk, low fat milk, cheeses (in particular parmesan cheese), soaps, shampoos, hair conditioners, cosmetics, medications, chicken pox vaccine, etc. At present, MSG is added to almost all industrially produced foods, including food for children.

But, why this scandal has grown around Glutamates?

We would not say it, but, recently, serious research companies have realized that Glutamates cause severe human degenerative diseases, schizophrenia among them.

Many scientists have informed that the platelet sensitivity to glutamate is increased in people with a tendency to nervous depression. (Berk, M., H. Plein & D. Ferreira. 2001. Platelet glutamate receptor supersensitivity in major depressive disorder. Clin. Neuropharmacology. 24: 129-132).

Several clinical studies demonstrate that the glutamates can cause severe nervous depression and schizophrenia. (Ian A. Paul and Phil Skolnick. Glutamate and Depression. Clinical and Preclinical Studies. Ann. N.Y. Academy of Sciences. 1003: 250–272. 2003).

Glutamates can cause nervous depression and suicidal proclivity, mainly in young people. (Gerard Sanacora, Douglas L. Rothman, Graeme Mason and John H. Krystal. Clinical Studies Implementing Glutamate Neurotransmission in Mood Disorders. Ann. N.Y. Academy of Sciences. 1003: 292–308. 2003).

The Society of Neuroscience has established that "Unquestionably, Glutamates, at doses encountered in products, cause severe injury to hypothalamus, the essential part of the brain for both memory and learning".

Recently, Bita Moghaddam and Barbara W. Adams, of the Department of Psychiatry in Yale University School of Medicine, reported irrefutable evidence on the involvement of Glutamates in schizophrenia.

The FDA has classified glutamates in the Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) category of additives. FDA bases its statement on a non-scientific report, published in 1971, whose falsehood has been repeatedly verified and exposed publicly. In 1971, Dr. W.A. Reynolds and colleagues published an article where they claimed that big doses of MSG supplied to baby monkeys "had no toxic effect" on infant monkey Central Nervous System. The scientific community doubted of Reynolds' study because in Dr. Olney's practice, large doses of MSG fed to animals at all times caused the animals to vomit. Dr. Reynolds et all did not mention any vomiting in their testing. If there were actually vomiting, it would nullify the Reynolds' study because MSG would not have been metabolized. Something is going wrong.

IN THE MEANWHILE, I WILL AVOID TO INCLUDE THESE "GRAS" IN MY NUTRITIONAL REGIME, AND PARTICULARLY IN THAT OF MY CHILDREN. NO ONE CAN CONTROL MY DETERMINATION ON CHOOSING THE HEALTHIEST FOOD THAT I AND MY CHILDREN SHOULD CONSUME.

Author: Biol. Nasif Nahle



BIBLIOGRAPHY

Berk, M., H. Plein & D. Ferreira. 2001. Platelet glutamate receptor supersensitivity in major depressive disorder. Clin. Neuropharmacology. 24: 129-132.

Ian A. Paul and Phil Skolnick. Glutamate and Depression. Clinical and Preclinical Studies. Ann. N.Y. Academy of Sciences. 1003: 250–272. 2003.

Gerard Sanacora, Douglas L. Rothman, Graeme Mason and John H. Krystal. Clinical Studies Implementing Glutamate Neurotransmission in Mood Disorders. Ann. N.Y. Academy of Sciences. 1003: 292–308. 2003.

Glutamate and Disorders of Cognition and Motivation; 13 to 15 April, 2003; sponsored by the New York Academy of Sciences.

Kohichi Tanaka, Kei Watase, Toshiya Manabe, Keiko Yamada, Masahiko Watanabe, Katsunobu Takahashi, Hisayuki Iwama, Toru Nishikawa, Nobutsune Ichihara, Tateki Kikuchi, Shigeru Okuyama, Naoya Kawashima, Seiji Hori, Misato Takimoto, and Keiji Wada; Epilepsy and Exacerbation of Brain Injury in Mice Lacking the Glutamate Transporter GLT-1; Science 1997 June 13; 276: pps.1699-1702.

Guochuan E. Tsai, William E. Falk, and Jeanette Gunther; A Preliminary Study of D-Cycloserine Treatment in Alzheimer's Disease; J. Neuropsychiatry. Clin.
Neurosci., May 1998; 10: 224 - 226.

Moghaddam, Bita and Adams, Barbara W.; Reversal of Phencyclidine Effects by a Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Agonist in Rats. Science 1998 August 28; 281: 1349-1352.

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