BEHAVIOR OF TEMPERATURES AT EACH LAYER OF A SPHERICAL PRIMIGENE TERRESTRIAL NEBULA
The red central circle symbolizes the primal Earth, where temperature increased from the surface toward the nucleus.

Layer A: It was the layer in touch with the surface of the primitive Earth. Its temperature was lower than Earth's temperature, but its temperature was progressively higher as it extended from Earth’s surface to outer space.

Layer B: Above from layer A. Its temperature was lower than that of layer A and it was gradually lower as it drew out from layer A. This layer displayed a higher state of turbulence than layers A and C.

Layer C: Situated immediately above layer B. It was the coldest layer, where biomolecules formed. Its temperature was gradually higher as it came into contact with layer D.

Layer D: The hottest of all terrestrial primordial nebula layers. Its temperature slightly diminished at its perimeter related with the outer space. This was the most turbulent layer because of its higher temperatures and by being disturbed by the solar wind. However, if this layer had not existed, the polymerization of biomolecules had not been possible.

This is a standard picture on the origin of Earth, but it is not a reasonable model about the circumstances of the primitive Earth because it would not be possible the existence of a transitional layer which were colder than the other layers. This is attributable to the transference of heat from one layer to another bordering layer. The temperature at the middle layer would be so high that it would not allow the minimal reaction of polymerization.


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